Sunday, September 26, 2010

A little piece of Alberta history.

Dunvegan Suspension Bridge
Yesterday we went to the horse auction held at Dawson Creek, British Columbia. The only and quickest way of getting there is heading south on highway 2. (Well, everything is basically south of here.) We have to cross over the Peace River. This bridge connects all of the north to Grande Prairie. Until 50 years ago, I don't know how they would have crossed. Maybe by a ferry or something. But to  some forward thinking people they got this bridge  an it officially opened in August, 1960. This suspension bridge, is called the Dunvegan Bridge.This bridge is the fourth largest vehicle suspension bridge in all of Canada, and the first of its kind in Alberta. The bridge is almost a kilometre long. Summer of 2008 -09 they refurbished the bridge. There was a lot time spent in the line waiting for your turn to cross. They did one lane in '08 and the other in '09. I read somewhere that the bridge was purposely painted in oranges, yellows and browns, to blend in more with the fall colours. I even heard that the bridge was bought second hand from the States.

The area where this bridge is located is chalk full of history. This area is the host to the oldest fur trading post in all of Alberta. The historical society has restored the fort and the mission buildings. There is a campground and an interpreter centre.
Crossing the Dunvegan Bridge

The mighty Peace River







I really love going southwardly, across the Peace River at Dunvegan especially in the fall. This photo above was taken on our way home, about 6.30 pm. We were climbing out of the valley, so we were travelling slow enough-we had a horse in the trailer-up the hill, so I could take this picture. This view is kind of towards the east.
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3 comments:

  1. Gorgeous photo of the valley at Dunvegan! The colours are so spectacular right now it's hard not to get distracted while driving. (I live in Peace River.)

    And yes, it was a ferry that people used to cross the Peace. That same ferry was used at the Shaftesbury crossing in more recent years as well.

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  2. Thanks for the history lesson. (I love history.) The shot of the valley is breathtaking.

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  3. Thanks Ladies!! I am glad you enjoyed the view.

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